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Meanwhile in India…

John on December 14, 2007 at 10:01 am

We’ve just had the shooting spree by Matt Murray which killed 5 (including himself). It’s still somewhat shocking when attacks aimed at Christians happen in the US. Overseas it’s a different matter altogether. In India for instance:

There have been 500 reported incidents of anti-Christian violence in India in the past 23 months, claimed a Bangalore-based Christian advocacy group this week…

“The attacks on Christians have been largely the sinister religious hatred of the Hindutva forces, under the umbrella organization of the Sangh Parivar (Family of Associations) like the RSS and the BJP, and their affiliate bodies like Bajrang Dal (Army of Hanuman), Vishwa Hindu Parishad (World Hindu Council) and others,” GCIC stated.

The group said it has urged Indian Prime Minister Dr. Manmohan Singh to invoke the constitutional provisions to control the BJP and its affiliates in order to restrain staff members from polluting the atmosphere with what appears to be its communal agenda.

Quoting one of the constitutional rights that grants every Indian citizen the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion, GCIC questioned why “seven states in India have introduced the anti-conversion laws which ban ‘forced’ religious conversions.”

“In the name of ‘forced’ religious conversions, many Christian workers and converts are being persecuted,” it alleged…

The victims include members of almost every church denomination in the country – Catholics, Protestants, and Evangelicals. They include priests, nuns, pastors, wives of pastors, believers, seminarians and Bible school students, and lay persons.

Violence includes attempted murder, armed assault, sexual molestation, illegal confinement and grievous injury.

I expect this sort of thing will become more common here as the media continues to paint Christians as a threat to civilization.

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Category: Religion & Faith |

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